Saturday, October 29, 2016

Inspirational poems of love,affection & Friendship:Gentle traveler(The fairest land) by Rumi***Reach Your Hand To Me by James Whitcomb Riley*** IN the garden of our affectionsby John McLandburgh

MUSIC: Anna Karenina Soundtrack- Dario Marianelli


The Fairest Land
Rumi

Tell me, gentle traveler, thou
Who hast wandered far and wide,
Seen the sweetest roses blow,
And the brightest rivers glide;
Say, of all thine eyes have seen,
Which the fairest land has been?

"Lady, shall I tell thee where
Nature seems most blest and fair,
Far above all climes beside?---
'Tis where those we love abide:
And that little spot is best
Which the loved one's foot hath pressed.

"Though it be a fairy space,
Wide and spreading is the place;
Though 'twere but a barren mound,
'Twould become enchanted ground.

"With thee yon sandy waste would seem
The margin of paradise stream;
And thou canst make a dungeon's gloom
A bower where new-born roses bloom."


Reach Your Hand To Me
James Whitcomb Riley

Reach your hand to me, my friend,
With its heartiest caress -
Sometime there will come an end
To its present faithfulness -
Sometime I may ask in vain
For the touch of it again,
When between us land or sea
Holds it ever back from me.

Sometime I may need it so,
Groping somewhere in the night,
It will seem to me as though
Just a touch, however light,
Would make all the darkness day,
And along some sunny way
Lead me through an April-shower
Of my tears to this fair hour.

O the present is too sweet
To go on forever thus!
Round the corner of the street
Who can say what waits for us? -
Meeting - greeting, night and day,
Faring each the self-same way -
Still somewhere the path must end.
Reach your hand to me, my friend!


IN the garden of our affections
there are certain loyal natures
that continue faithful through all
things ; as in the kingdom of vegeta-
tion there are certain finely organized
and sensitive growths of flower and
vine, which are so susceptible to
warmth, and light, and beauty, that
they do nothing all their lives but
look at the sun.

In the russet dawn,
with a sublime faith, they watch the
East for his coming. Turning on
their slender stems all day long, they
follow him as he makes the circuit
of the sky ; and at nightfall, after he
has sunk from sight, we behold again
these flowers, their faces westward
now, with the dewdrops shining on
their petals, like tears gathered in the
eyes of parted friendship.
John McLandburgh

Friday, October 28, 2016

You're a spiritual being in human form


You're a spiritual being in human form.
Sometimes you simply desire to connect
with a soul who feels like home.

In the life of each of us :A hermit by Sarah orner Jewett


In the life of each of us, I said to myself,
there is a place remote and islanded,
and given to endless regret or secret happiness;
we are each the uncompanioned hermit and recluse
of an hour or a day; we understand our fellows
of the cell to whatever age of history they may belong.
Sarah Orne Jewett

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Believing is easier than thinking by Bruce Calvert


Believing is easier than thinking.
Hence so many more believers than thinkers.
Bruce Calvert

The dancing poppies by John keats


Through the dancing poppies stole a breeze,
most softly lulling to my soul.
John Keats

That we find a crystal or a poppy beautiful means that
we are less alone, that we are more deeply inserted
into existence than the course of a single life would
lead us to believe.
John Berger

The butterfly by Maya Angelou


We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit
the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty.
Maya Angelou

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Romance by Sanober Khan


Valdimir Volegov Art

To fall in love with someone's thoughts -
the most intimate, splendid romance.
Sanober Khan

Not words. nor laughter. but rather someone
who will fall in love with your silence.
Sanober Khan

At a distance all becomes romantic by Novalis


Everything at a distance turns into poetry:
distant mountains, distant people, distant events:
all becomes romantic.
Novalis

Monday, October 24, 2016

Friday, October 21, 2016

A Thing of Beauty is a Joy Forever by John Keats & other poems of life & Romanticism



Music:
Michel Pépé - Elixir d'Amour - Retrouvailles





A Thing of Beauty is a Joy Forever
by John Keats
Excerpt:Endymion:A Poetic Romance

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its loveliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
Of all the unhealthy and o'er-darkened ways
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,

Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon,
Trees old, and young, sprouting a shady boon
For simple sheep; and such are daffodils
With the green world they live in; and clear rills
That for themselves a cooling covert make
'Gainst the hot season; the mid-forest brake,
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms:
And such too is the grandeur of the dooms
We have imagined for the mighty dead;
All lovely tales that we have heard or read:
An endless fountain of immortal drink,
Pouring unto us from the heaven's brink.

Nor do we merely feel these essences
For one short hour; no, even as the trees
That whisper round a temple become soon
Dear as the temple's self, so does the moon,
The passion poesy, glories infinite,
Haunt us till they become a cheering light
Unto our souls, and bound to us so fast
That, whether there be shine or gloom o'ercast,
They always must be with us, or we die.



From Ode on a Grecian Urn
John Keats

Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard
Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on;
Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd,
Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone:
Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave
Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare;
Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss,
Though winning near the goal—yet, do not grieve;
She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss,
For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!

Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed
Your leaves, nor ever bid the Spring adieu;
And, happy melodist, unwearièd,
For ever piping songs for ever new;
More happy love! more happy, happy love!
For ever warm and still to be enjoy'd,
For ever panting, and for ever young;
All breathing human passion far above,
That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloy'd,
A burning forehead, and a parching tongue.




Wherein lies happiness?

Yet my higher hope Is of too wide,
too rainbow-large a scope,
To fret at myriads of earthly wrecks.

Wherein lies happiness? In that which becks
Our ready minds to fellowship divine,
A fellowship with essence; till we shine,
Full alchemiz’d, and free of space. Behold
The clear religion of heaven!
John Keats,Endymion

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

The BIRTH OF SPIRITUAL BEAUTY BY William Butler Yeats


As I thought of these things, I drew aside the curtains and looked
out into the darkness, and it seemed to my troubled fancy that all
those little points of light filling the sky were the furnaces
of innumerable divine alchemists, who labour continually, turning
lead into gold, weariness into ecstasy, bodies into souls,
the darkness into God; and at their perfect labour my mortality
grew heavy, and I cried out, as so many dreamers and men of letters
in our age have cried, for the birth of that elaborate spiritual
beauty which could alone uplift souls weighted with so many dreams.
William Butler Yeats,Rosa Alchemica

RULES FOR LIFE BY MARK TWAIN


Life is short, Break the Rules.
Forgive quickly, Kiss SLOWLY.
Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably
And never regret ANYTHING
That makes you smile.
Mark Twain

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Beauty and Virtue by Matthew Prior


For, when with beauty we can virtue join,
We paint the semblance of a form divine.
Matthew Prior

Van Gogh Paintings

Luca Agnani's "Van Gogh Shadow"brings Vincent Van Gogh paintings
to life using 3D animation and visual mapping.


The real life by Alfred D. Souza


For a long time it had seemed to me that
life was about to begin - real life.
But there was always some obstacle in the way,
something to be gotten through first, some unfinished business,
time still to be served, a debt to be paid.Then life would begin.

At last it dawned on me that these obstacles were my life.
Alfred D. Souza

Monday, October 17, 2016

The world is large,the world is small


The world is large when its weary
leagues two loving hearts divide;
But the world is small when your enemy
is loose on the other side.
John Boyle O'Reilly

Thoughts by ARDELTA COTTON BARTON


When soul to soul can message send--
Dispatched from mind to mind--
All nations will be swayed by thought,
And thought will rule mankind.
ARDELIA COTTON BARTON, Thoughts

The garden of our affections by John McLandburgh.


IN the garden of our affections
there are certain loyal natures
that continue faithful through all
things ; as in the kingdom of vegeta-
tion there are certain finely organized
and sensitive growths of flower and
vine, which are so susceptible to
warmth, and light, and beauty, that
they do nothing all their lives but
look at the sun.

In the russet dawn,
with a sublime faith, they watch the
East for his coming. Turning on
their slender stems all day long, they
follow him as he makes the circuit
of the sky ; and at nightfall, after he
has sunk from sight, we behold again
these flowers, their faces westward
now, with the dewdrops shining on
their petals, like tears gathered in the
eyes of parted friendship.
John McLandburgh

Friday, October 14, 2016

The individual by Ludwig von Mises

All rational action is in the first place individual action.
Only the individual thinks. Only the individual reasons.
Only the individual acts.
Ludwig von Mises

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

THE DREAM BY Fyodor Dostoyevsky/Excerpt From"The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

Music:
Can Atilla - Hamamda Ilk Gözyaslari




The dream
Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Excerpt From"The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

Yes, I dreamed a dream.They tease me now,
telling me it was only a dream. But does it
matter whether it was a dream or reality,
if the dream made known to me the truth? ...

Let it be a dream, so be it, but that real life of which you make so much
I had meant to extinguish by suicide, and my dream, my dream — oh, it
revealed to me a different life, renewed, grand and full of power!

Dreams, as we all know, are very queer things: some parts are presented
with appalling vividness, with details worked up with the elaborate finish
of jewellery, while others one gallops through, as it were, without noticing
them at all, as, for instance, through space and time. Dreams seem to be
spurred on not by reason but by desire, not by the head but by the heart,
and yet what complicated tricks my reason has played sometimes in dreams,
what utterly incomprehensible things happen to it!


The children of the sun, the children of their sun — oh, how beautiful
they were!Never had I seen on our own earth such beauty in mankind.
Only perhaps in our children, in their earliest years, one might find,
some remote faint reflection of this beauty. The eyes of these happy
people shone with a clear brightness.Their faces were radiant with
the light of reason and fullness of a serenity that comes of perfect
understanding, but those faces were gay; in their words and voices
there was a note of childlike joy.

Oh, from the first moment, from the first glance at them, I understood
it all! It was the earth untarnished by the Fall;...
They lived just in such a paradise as that in which, according to all
the legends of mankind, our first parents lived...
the only difference was that all this earth was the same paradise.

These people, laughing joyfully, thronged round me and caressed me;
they took me home with them, and each of them tried to reassure me.
Oh, they asked me no questions, but they seemed, I fancied, to know
everything without asking, and they wanted to make haste to smoothe
away the signs of suffering from my face.


Well, granted that it was only a dream, yet the sensation of the love
of those innocent and beautiful people has remained with me for ever,
and I feel as though their love is still flowing out to me from over there.
I have seen them myself, have known them and been convinced; I loved them,
I suffered for them afterwards.

Oh, I understood at once even at the time that in many things I could
not understand them at all … But I soon realised that their knowledge
was gained and fostered by intuitions different from those of us on earth,
and that their aspirations, too,were quite different...

They showed me their trees, and I could not understand the intense
love with which they looked at them; it was as though they were
talking with creatures like themselves.And perhaps I shall not be
mistaken if I say that they conversed with them. Yes, they had found
their language, and I am convinced that the trees understood them.

They looked at all Nature like that — at the animals who lived in
peace with them and did not attack them, but loved them, conquered
by their love. They pointed to the stars and told me something about
them which I could not understand, but I am convinced that they were
somehow in touch with the stars, not only in thought, but by some
living channel.


They had no temples, but they had a real living and uninterrupted sense
of oneness with the whole of the universe; they had no creed, but they
had a certain knowledge that when their earthly joy had reached the limits
of earthly nature, then there would come for them, for the living and for
the dead, a still greater fullness of contact with the whole of the universe.
They looked forward to that moment with joy, but without haste, not pining
for it, but seeming to have a foretaste of it in their hearts, of which
they talked to one another.

They sang the praises of nature, of the sea, of the woods. They liked
making songs about one another, and praised each other like children;
they were the simplest songs,but they sprang from their hearts and went
to one's heart. And not only in their songs but in all their lives
they seemed to do nothing but admire one another.
It was like being in love with each other,
but an all-embracing,universal feeling.


I have seen the truth; I have seen and I know that people can be
beautiful and happy without losing the power of living on earth.
I will not and cannot believe that evil is the normal condition of mankind.
And it is just this faith of mine that they laugh at.

I am a ridiculous person. Now they call me a madman. That would be
a promotion if it were not that I remain as ridiculous in their eyes
as before. But now I do not resent it, they are all dear to me now,
even when they laugh at me — and, indeed, it is just then that they
are particularly dear to me.

I could join in their laughter — not exactly at myself, but through
affection for them, if I did not feel so sad as I look at them.
Sad because they do not know the truth and I do know it.
Oh, how hard it is to be the only one who knows the truth!
But they won't understand that. No, they won't understand it.


A dream! What is a dream? And is not our life a dream?
I will say more. Suppose that this paradise will never come to pass
(that I understand), yet I shall go on preaching it.

And yet how simple it is: in one day, in one hour everything
could be arranged at once!

The chief thing is to love others like yourself, that's the chief thing,
and that's everything;nothing else is wanted — you will find out at
once how to arrange it all.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Something in the autumn by Bliss Carman

There is something in the autumn
that is native to my blood-
Touch of manner, hint of mood;
And my heart is like a rhyme,
With the yellow and the purple
and the crimson keeping time.
Bliss Carman

Monday, October 10, 2016

Quotes on Secrets of nature


As long as I retain my feeling and my passion for Nature, I can partly
soften or subdue my other passions and resist or endure those of others.
Lord Byron

There is no trifling with nature; it is always true, grave, and severe;
it is always in the light, and the faults and errors fall to our share.
It defies incompetency, but reveals its secrets to the competent,
the truthful, and the pure.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Into every empty corner, into all forgotten things and nooks, nature
struggles to pour life, pouring life into the dead, life into life itself.
Henry Beston

Love: a glimpse of another world by Miguel de Unamuno


And love, above all when it struggles against destiny,
overwhelms us with the feeling of the vanity of this
world of appearances and gives us a glimpse of another
world,in which destiny is overcome and liberty is law.
Miguel de Unamuno

Thursday, October 6, 2016

The unison with nature by D. H. Lawrence


Oh, what a catastrophe for man when he cut himself off from
the rhythm of the year, from his unison with the sun and the earth.

Oh, what a catastrophe, what a maiming of love when it was a personal,
merely personal feeling, taken away from the rising and the setting
of the sun,and cut off from the magic connection of the solstice and the equinox!
D. H. Lawrence

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Being in love by Anton Chekhov



Perhaps the feelings that we experience when
we are in love represent a normal state.
Being in love shows a person who he should be.
Anton Chekhov

Think Love by Ella Wheeler Wilcox


Hide in your heart a bitter thought,
Still it has power to blight;
Think Love, although you speak it
not It gives the world more light.
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

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